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Who is an ECS student?

At Emerald City School we believe that education should be a transformative experience. Academic interests should be kindled and developed, while areas of challenge may be strengthened so that they never present a roadblock to success. 

The foundation of our academic program comes from a deep understanding that each student learns differently and can learn. Thus, we use diverse curricula that develops students’ core skills and knowledge for college and career success. We optimize learning by small classes size, evidence-based pedagogies, explicit skill instruction, and clear learning objectives.

Learning disabilities are not a prescription for failure. With the right kinds of instruction, guidance and support, there are no limits to what individuals with LD can achieve.”

— Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D., Director of LD Resources National Center for Learning Disabilities

Learning Disabilities:

Common characteristics include:

  • difficulty with counting, learning number facts and doing math calculations
  • difficulty with measurement, telling time, counting money and estimating number quantities
  • trouble with mental math and problem-solving strategies

Common characteristics include:

  • difficulty with phonemic awareness (the ability to notice, think about and work with individual sounds in words)
  • phonological processing (detecting and discriminating differences in phonemes or speech sounds)
  • difficulties with word decoding, fluency, rate of reading, rhyming, spelling, vocabulary, comprehension and written expression

Common characteristics include:

  • difficulty with counting, learning number facts and doing math calculations
  • difficulty with measurement, telling time, counting money and estimating number quantities
  • trouble with mental math and problem-solving strategies

Common characteristics include:

  • visual discrimination (the ability to notice and compare the features of different items and to distinguish one item from another)
  • visual figure-ground discrimination (the ability to distinguish a shape or printed character from its background)
  • visual sequencing (the ability to see and distinguish the order of symbols, words or images)
  • visual motor processing (using visual feedback to coordinate body movement)
  • visual memory (the ability to engage in short-term and long-term recall of visual information)
  • visual closure (the ability to know what an object is when only parts of it are visible)
  • spatial relationships (the ability to understand how objects are positioned in space)

Individuals with these types of difficulties often have trouble with:

  • auditory discrimination (the ability to notice, compare and distinguish the distinct and separate sounds in words — a skill that is vital for reading)
  • auditory figure-ground discrimination (the ability to pick out important sounds from a noisy background)
  • auditory memory (short-term and long-term abilities to recall information presented orally)
  • auditory sequencing (the ability to understand and recall the order of sounds and words)
  • spelling, reading and written expression
  • Inattention means a person wanders off task, lacks persistence, has difficulty sustaining focus, and is disorganized; and these problems are not due to defiance or lack of comprehension.
  • Hyperactivity means a person seems to move about constantly, including in situations in which it is not appropriate; or excessively fidgets, taps, or talks. In adults, it may be extreme restlessness or wearing others out with constant activity.
  • Impulsivity means a person makes hasty actions that occur in the moment without first thinking about them and that may have high potential for harm; or a desire for immediate rewards or inability to delay gratification. An impulsive person may be socially intrusive and excessively interrupt others or make important decisions without considering the long-term consequences.
  • Inhibition – The ability to stop one’s own behavior at the appropriate time, including stopping actions and thoughts. The flip side of inhibition is impulsivity
  • Shift – The ability to move freely from one situation to another and to think flexibly in order to respond appropriately to the situation.
  • Emotional Control – The ability to modulate emotional responses by bringing rational thought to bear on feelings.
  • Initiation – The ability to begin a task or activity and to independently generate ideas, responses, or problem-solving strategies
  • Working memory – The capacity to hold information in mind for the purpose of completing a task.
  • Planning/Organization – The ability to manage current and future- oriented task demands.
  • Organization of Materials – The ability to impose order on work, play, and storage spaces.
  • Self-Monitoring – The ability to monitor one’s own performance and to measure it against some standard of what is needed or expected.